Solar 2021

Modeling & Scaling Track: Grid Integration and Maintenance

Session Moderator: Paul Ndione

On the opposite end of the spectrum from community power is integration of grid resources on increasingly large scales. This session discusses the increasing interest in how to both integrate and maintain a grids operatively across many different commercial and political entities. This becomes an even greater issue as the diversity of renewable resources and storage moieties become physically integrated with the grid. Ultimate grids will need to include the evolution of these resources as well as of the grid itself.

Date

Aug 05 2021

Time

10:45 am - 12:15 pm

Location

West Ballroom

Speakers

  • Ben Glenzer
    Ben Glenzer
    Solar Solutions For All

    Working as a Renewable Energy Professional since 1987 for multiple global corporations and global organizations. Those range from non-profit to Fortune 500 entities. By education an information technology systems engineer, I have worked in multiple leadership roles: program-/project- manager, senior consultant, vice president, partner, COO.
    Presentation Title: Energy Storage – The Game Changer in the Future Energy Market

    Presentation Description: With the latest energy storage technologies and its breakthrough capabilities utilities, grid-operators and communities will be capable to redesign the energy landscape in ways, which were not possible since Edison.

  • James Hyungkwan Kim
    James Hyungkwan Kim
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    James Hyungkwan Kim is an Energy Policy Project Scientist in the Electricity Markets and Policy Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. I lead, support, conduct, report, and present research on renewable energy markets, policies, economics. Also, I conduct research on the value and costs of power system technologies and related market policy and develop methods to estimate dispatch of flexible resources in response to grid needs.
    Presentation Title: Enhancing the Value of Solar Energy as Solar and Storage Penetrations Increase

    Presentation Description: In this study, we offer a comprehensive analysis of the cost and value of multiple PV configurations across various solar penetrations associated with historical and projected U.S. wholesale power prices. We compare existing PV plants with grid-friendly PV options ranging from simple tilt and azimuth adjustments to vertical bifacial modules, provision of ancillary services, and addition of energy storage. We calculate marginal grid value using wholesale market prices reflecting energy, capacity, and ancillary services and coincident solar output profiles.

  • Mark Bolinger
    Mark Bolinger
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Mark Bolinger is a Research Scientist in the Electricity Markets and Policy Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he’s worked for the past 20 years. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Mark conducts research on wind, solar, and geothermal energy, with a focus on understanding the cost, performance, and value of renewable generation within electricity markets. He co-leads Berkeley Lab’s annual market data reports for utility-scale wind and solar. Mark holds a masters degree in Energy and Resources from the University of California at Berkeley, and a bachelors degree from Dartmouth College.

    Presentation Title: Nevada’s Eldorado Valley: A Microcosm of Utility-Scale Solar’s Evolution and Progress in the United States

    Presentation Description: Nevada’s Eldorado Valley is the birthplace of modern utility-scale solar in the United States. In 2007, the Valley became home to the first CSP trough project built in the U.S. since 1990. A year later, a 10 MW PV project—one of the first utility-scale PV projects built in the US—came online right next door. Since then, the Valley has gained another eleven PV projects totaling ~1,100 MW, and at least two more totaling ~400 MW are expected this year. These projects encompass a wide array of technologies and configurations, evolving from CSP trough to fixed-tilt CdTe, fixed-tilt c-Si, c-Si with single-axis tracking (SAT), bifacial c-Si with SAT, and more recently even including battery storage. The steady ongoing development and evolution within this concentrated geographic area serves as a useful microcosm for the entire industry. This presentation will demonstrate the great strides that utility-scale solar has made over the past 15 years by analyzing project-level cost, performance, PPA pricing, and wholesale market value among all projects in the Valley. Analysis of project-level data is facilitated by the close proximity of all projects, which controls for both the solar resource (i.e., essentially the same for all sites) and site construction conditions (ditto), thereby concentrating the focus solely on advancements in technology, cost, performance, and value.

  • Mark Bolinger_
    Mark Bolinger_
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Mark Bolinger is a Research Scientist in the Electricity Markets and Policy Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he’s worked for the past 20 years. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Mark conducts research on wind, solar, and geothermal energy, with a focus on understanding the cost, performance, and value of renewable generation within electricity markets. He co-leads Berkeley Lab’s annual market data reports for utility-scale wind and solar. Mark holds a masters degree in Energy and Resources from the University of California at Berkeley, and a bachelors degree from Dartmouth College.

    Presentation Title: Land requirements for utility-scale PV: An empirical update on power density (MW/acre) and energy density (MWh/acre)

    Presentation Description:As the threat of climate change heightens calls for “energy transition,” energy analysts and planners require accurate, updated information on the land requirements to reach high penetrations of wind and solar power. Yet the last major study of utility-scale solar’s “power density” (MW/acre) in the United States was published back in 2013, and suffered from a number of shortcomings, including: a small sample size (as the industry was still young at that time); a misplaced focus on AC rather than DC capacity (when it is the latter that impacts land requirements); a non-uniform reliance on several different and inconsistent data sources (e.g., a mix of permit data and satellite imagery); and a focus on power density (MW/acre) at the expense of the arguably-more-important energy density (MWh/acre). For the past nine years, Berkeley Lab has published its annual “Utility-Scale Solar” market data report series (utilityscalesolar.lbl.gov), amassing a wide range of empirical, project-level data on ~800 utility-scale (i.e., ground-mounted and >5 MW-AC) PV projects dating back to 2007 and totaling >29 GW-AC of capacity. In 2020, Berkeley Lab researchers manually drew polygons around satellite imagery of each of these projects, enabling the first accurate and up-to-date assessment of both power density and energy density. This presentation will present the results of this effort, illustrating trends in both density measures over time, by region, and by technology (e.g., fixed-tilt vs. tracking).

  • Yacob Hiben
    Yacob Hiben
    Mekelle University

    Born and raised in Ethiopia, as a young boy who lived in developing country his choices was
    limited when he finished high school. It had been always his dreams and ambitions to develop a career that has tangible impacts. As the objective of his career, he joined Mekelle University in 2002. Finally, he majored Mechanical Engineering and graduated with good grade in 2007 and joined Jimma University as a full time academic staff. This motivated him to pursue his joint master’s in Energy sponsored by KIC Innoenergy, 2011 cohort. Currently, he is a lecturer and Ph.D candidate at Mekelle University, Ethiopia.

    Presentation Title: Infinite NTU Modeling of Rock Bed Thermal Energy Storage
    Presentation Description: Packed beds incorporating rock as the storage medium and air as the heat transfer fluid have been proposed as a cost effective approach for thermal storage in solar power plants. In order to assess the viability of rock bed thermal energy storage (TES), it is essentially necessary to predict the air and rock temperature profiles through the bed during charging and discharging. Typically, the more detailed a model, the greater the computational effort required to solve it. For long-term analysis, a time-efficient model is necessary to prevent excessively long computation times. This paper evaluates the appropriateness of employing the less realistic but less costly Infinite NTU model.

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